Harue-Marsden-

Tribute to Dr. Harue Marsden

With a heavy heart, we want to inform all OCOS members that Dr. Harue Marsden passed away after an extended fight against cancer on Thursday Feb 2. She passed away in the comfort of her own home. There will be a memorial service next Friday, February 10. For those wish to attend it will be at Marshall B. Ketchum University and you can check out the Ketchum Website for more details soon.

Harue was an amazing woman, a great mentor to her students, and dedicated so much of herself to the profession of optometry. Incredibly devoted to OCOS, she attended virtually every meeting and even our board meetings to help guide and nurture the future leaders of our society. I think it was her favorite thing to do, to inspire and develop young people to achieve more of the potential she saw in them. I remember seeing her just a couple weeks ago and she was fired up to discuss topics for our upcoming house of delegates meeting. She was always so excited to be an instrument of change, because for her, it symbolized the steady upward march of optometric progress. And it’s why she loved so much to talk to young people who were unburdened by the past—who couldn’t wait to seize the future.

I personally experienced this as she was my contact lens mentor and later friend on the OCOS board. I remember like yesterday at one of our OCOS meetings 3 years ago, she won a VISA gift certificate courtesy of one of our sponsors. A SCCO student had pulled her winning ticket. She strolled up to collect her prize, but once she got to the front she took the gift and handed it to the student who pulled her ticket with a smile. I’ve never seen anyone else do that, but that was just who Harue was.

So I ask of OCOS to honor the memory of Harue. To be worthy of her life’s work and for our part actively promote our wonderful profession. To say “yes” to those emails and calls from pre-optometry and optometry students who want to visit us in practice to learn. To break bread, share a good drink, and create lasting relationships with your optometrists colleagues. We’ll certainly miss her. We lost a good one and may she rest in peace.

Thanh Mai, OD
OCOS President

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December is Safe Gifts and Toys Month

As a parent of two young children, I know all too well the trials of the holiday season. First of all is the challenge of getting my kids to appreciate giving as much as receiving. And, despite the best intentions of friends and family, I need to be diligent in inspecting that all toys are safe and appropriate. In 2015, the Consumer Product Safety Commission reported 254,200 toy-related injuries treated in hospital emergency rooms. Most of these involved lacerations, contusions or abrasions (41%) and most affected the head and face area (45%). In response to this problem that poses such a significant risk to our children’s eyesight, Prevent Blindness America has declared December “Safe Toys and Gifts Month”.

Prevent Blindness America recommends the following guidelines when purchasing gifts:

  • Only buy toys meant for the child’s age and maturity level
  • Purchase toys that meet the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards
  • Read all warnings and instructions on the box
  • Avoid purchasing toys with sharp or rigid points, spikes, rods or dangerous edges
  • Buy toys that will withstand impact and not break into dangerous shards
  • Avoid toys that shoot or include parts that fly off

They also recommend the following guidelines when your children are at play:

  • Keep an eye on your children while they play
  • Keep young children away from toys meant for older children
  • Supervise children’s art projects (particularly those involving glue and scissors)
  • Have children wear the right protective eyewear when playing with toys
  • Store toys properly to prevent slips and falls
  • Fix or throw away broken toys

By following these simple guidelines, we can substantially reduce the number of toy-related injuries and make sure that this is a happy, festive holiday season with less trips to the emergency room.

-Steven Wang, OD